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Why is Uncle Ruckus Racist?

May 24th, 2010 by ccasares110

Earlier this year we watched that video called “A Girl Like Me” and we saw how society sets standards of what is good and what is bad. We learned about symbolic violence and how we are in a way brain washed to believe the ideas put forth by society are correct. The little girl from the video was exposed to racism for the first time when she said the that white doll was the good doll and the black one was the bad one. She wanted to pick up the white doll when she was asked which one looked like her. Then she realized she looked like the one that wasn’t “good.” So does the media and society cause people to strive to become what is depicted as ideal? Can people hate who they are and strive to change it and conform to what is believed as correct? It really does happen when you look at celebrities that are black how come over the years their skin gets lighter? Look at people like eddie murphy when he first started and what he looks like now. The media is making people of different races in America racist towards themselves in a way. And this is what leads to Uncle Ruckus.  To learn who Uncle Ruckus is click on the link right here: Uncle Ruckus

Now why is Uncle Ruckus the way he is? He obviously is black but why does he degrade himself and his own people in that manner. He has obviously been influenced by some source in his life that has changed his beliefs to believe that being white is the best thing to be. There obviously was some sort of brainwashing that could change a person to be this way. Uncle Ruckus is the prime/extreme example of the lesson being taught in a Girl Like Me. Does he himself believe he is white just as the little girl believed she looked like the white doll?  Why is he like this and what could have caused it?  Has he been influenced by society as we are every single day?

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Final Version of revised essay

May 24th, 2010 by ccasares110

Carlos Casares

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

4 April 2010

Natural Growth as a Way of Child Rearing: Social Class and It’s Effects on Upbringing Based on Annette Lareau’s Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life

Child rearing practices have a tremendous effect on a child’s future. The way a child is raised determines how one functions when they grow up. The type of rearing varies greatly through different social classes. Annette Lareau, a sociologist, studied the difference in child rearing methods between social classes. In her book Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Lareau describes these methods and their effects on children. These effects determine the amount of success a child will have in the future. Based on lareau’s data if the glorified way of child rearing is not applied then a child will not perform in an institutional setting.

Economic Conditions and Their Effect on Child Rearing

Child rearing strategies vary for each social class. Working class people use natural growth as a method of child rearing.  Through natural growth a child has more independence and more freedom. For them a boundary exists between adults and children. Parents use directives rather than verbally persuading their kids to do things. Middle class people who use concerted cultivation enroll their children in organized activities in order to cultivate their talents. Social class influences the method of child rearing. The amount of income received and revenue accessible to the parents may determine their social class. Lareau claims:

On the basis of the data collected, I develop the claim that common economic position in the society, determined in terms of social class membership, is closely tied to the differences in the cultural logic of child rearing. (31)

My parents are considered working class according to Lareau’s criteria. Their parents also belonged to the working class. Therefore their beliefs on child rearing lean more towards the natural growth method. Natural growth influenced my upbringing. The complete form as described in the book did not influence my child rearing. However my parents used a modified version of it. Some examples of Lareau’s form of Natural Growth include: dependence on institutions, a sense of powerlessness and frustration, and conflict between child rearing practices at home and at school. We never really had a lot of spending money so organized activities didn’t play a factor in my life. With the money we had I got toys and things like video games and played independently or with my friends.  I was more independent and stayed home by myself sometimes because my parents both had to work. My mom works as a full time nurse and my dad has two jobs as a lab technician in the hospital. Important things like paying the bills came first, not enrolling me in organized activities that are costly. People in middle class families have money on hand and could buy their kids BMW’s as their first car and stuff. But to have extra money to spend my parents have to work for it. So through different social classes, obvious differences are visible because money and the amount of time parents spend working will influence how they can bring up their kids. Therefore, Lareau is correct in her claim because social class plays an important factor in child rearing.

As a child I knew my economic condition and but I still had choices of things I could do. Being part of the working class did not mean I was poor so therefore I had something. In fact in my opinion I had a lot. If I wanted to play with my friends or go out I made that choice. I got everything I basically could ask for and whether I had the choice to be active with my friends or not.  Lareau describes this as the accomplishment of natural growth. In Unequal Childhoods she writes:

The limited economic resources available to the working class and poor families make getting children fed, clothed, sheltered and transported time-consuming, arduous labor. Parents tend to direct their efforts toward keeping children safe, enforcing discipline, and, when they deem it necessary, regulating their behavior in specific areas. Within these boundaries, working-class and poor children are allowed to grow and to thrive. They are given the flexibility to choose activities and playmates and to decide how active or inactive to be as they engage in these activities. Thus, whereas middle-class children are often treated as a project to be developed, working-class and poor children are given boundaries for their behavior and then allowed to grow. (66-67)

My parents worked to make sure I had everything I needed. Whenever my dad and I got into an argument he always said “I work so hard to make sure you have food and everything you need.” So he made it known that he worked to do things like that and found it necessary to “enforce discipline” in that area so I could be thankful for what I had. I believe this is the basis of natural growth. Parents who can’t afford to give their kids everything but work as hard as they can to give them everything they can and keep them safe and happy and give them as good a life as possible. To me I felt like I got enough time from my parents, and I knew they would go to work so I could get the things I wanted so it never bothered me. To me everything that happened in my childhood I considered normal. I never felt neglected because my parents had to work or anything.

Growing Up Through a Means of Natural Growth

Growing up I became more independent and I liked to do things without my parents help. This really happened in 5th grade because I was required to do more things on my own. It started with school and now that 5th grade begun I had to take the school bus to take me to a separate building that only held the 5th grade.  My parents went to work in the morning which left me to take the bus on my own and come home and stay alone. I actually enjoyed it because I wanted to be more independent; I wanted to do things on my own. According to Annette Lareau this results of a lack of adult attention in my activities. She writes:

The lack of adult attention and involvement in their activities leaves children in working-class and poor homes free to concentrate on pleasing themselves. The children we studied tended to show more creativity, spontaneity, enjoyment, and initiative in their leisure pastimes than we saw among middle-class children at play in organized activities. (83)

The lack of adult attention gives working class children more freedom and a sense of independence. Unlike children in the middle class who are spoon fed their childhood experiences and leisure activities, working class children create their own. However, these traits that the children acquire through their freedom are not valued by the institutions and therefore become useless for that environment. My parent’s jobs left me on my own most of the time and I actually enjoyed it. I felt older having more freedom and independence in doing my own things. I remember I used to look forward to going to school because all the people at my bus stop and I  would come a little bit early before the bus came to chill and just hang out and have fun. The same went for after school we would all get on the bus and have a lot of fun. When we got off a big group of us all hung out and had fun. I describe “leisure pastimes” as just those stories that one can talk about with one’s friends and say “remember when…,”therefore I certainly enjoyed my leisure pastime.  I enjoyed having the freedom to stay home alone and I wanted to because to me I was older and having a baby sitter was childish.  But like all the kids I grew up with I had the same mindset. We were mature for our age. I have a little sister and she’s very dependent on my mom, but I think that results from my parents taking more of a concerted cultivation approach to her. My cousin went to school with me in 5th grade and sometimes we talk about the things we remember like fights, the bus rides, or just stupid things. The independence I had allowed me to enjoy my childhood more because I had the ability to make decisions and do what I wanted. Also spending time with my friends allowed me to enjoy my childhood and it gave me stories to tell.

Growing up a clear boundary presented itself between adult and child. My father emphasized this boundary especially. He believes this in this boundary and taught me to always respect adults and know my place. However our views of respect have greatly differed from the past until this present day. He believes more in natural growth because he was raised that way. Lareau describes parents’ ideology in this subject as:

These mothers and fathers do not focus on concerted cultivation. For them, the crucial responsibilities of parenthood do not lie in eliciting their children’s feelings, opinions, and thoughts. Rather, they see a clear boundary between adults and children. (pg.3)

Thus whereas middle class children often are treated as a project to be developed, working class and poor children are given boundaries for their behavior and then allowed to grow. (67)

Growing up I had to show respect to my elders like my grandparents, parents, aunt, and uncles. I had always felt it was unnecessary to call my aunts and uncles either aunt or uncle before their actual name. I always got in trouble for that and still do sometimes to this day by my dad.  Every time I forgot I always got the response “Oh is that your brother/sister, I thought they were my brother/sister.” Being a very stubborn man, my father always flipped out when I talked back or questioned his demands. I always thought that was ridiculous and very childlike when he threw a fit whenever he was questioned. My father believed in the “clear boundary” between adults and children and “elicit” my feelings, opinions or thoughts when he wanted me to do something.

The Effects of Natural Growth

Natural growth as a means of child rearing has both positive and negative effects. Natural growth yields the accomplishment of natural growth (the positive) and a sense of constraint (the negative). The sense of constraint affects one’s performance in institutional settings. When raised through natural growth one “is less likely to try to customize interactions to suit their own preferences (6).” They conform to the actions of the institution and persons of authority. The result of conformity in institutional settings produces children “unable to make the rules work for in their favor nor do they obtain capital for adulthood (7).” Lareau explains this writing:

What is the outcome of these different philosophies and approaches to child rearing? Quite simply they lead to the transmission of differential advantages to children. In this study, there was quite a bit more talking in the middle class homes than in working-class and poor homes, leading to the development of greater verbal agility, larger vocabularies, more comfort with authority figures, and more familiarity with abstract concepts. Importantly, children also developed skill differences in interacting with authority figures in institutions and at home. (5)

Both Natural Growth and Concerted Cultivation have effects. The differences in both these methods lead to radically different ideologies in children that give them certain abilities and advantages. Working-class children have more creativity and a sense of independence; however none of these aspects aid these children in institutional settings. The middle-class children who are cultivated through organized activities and open conversations with adults increase the level of comfort with authority figures. This allows them to function properly in an institutional setting. Every time I went to the doctor I never told him my symptoms or how I felt. My mom decided that job belonged to her. Maybe because she works as a nurse, and she felt entitled to tell the doctor my symptoms could possibly explain her actions. As a child I didn’t mind, but as I started getting older I would tell her not to come in but she did regardless.  By doing this she contributed to developing a sense of constraint for me by obstructing my communication in an institutional environment. My experiences in the doctor’s office differ from a middle-class child like Alexander Williams whose mother “explicitly trained and encouraged him to speak up with the doctor (6).” When Alexander visited the doctor he addressed the doctor directly and had the ability to describe exactly what bothered him and asked questions. Through concerted cultivation, Alexander received the proper tools and training necessary for him to function in this type of institutional environment.

I propose that Annette Lareau did not fully cover the ways of child rearing methods. She only described the far extremes of both Natural Growth and Concerted Cultivation and did not investigate children who are raised with modified versions of both methods. The types of children described in her book were either part of the lower classes that sound like they live in the projects or middle-class people who live in houses with pools in their back yard. No mention of children who are in between that I think more people can relate to were mentioned. The data collected by Lareau is just the beginning of a topic that is very complex and needs much more investigating. For example: how about different ethnic groups, different regions of the country, children who use a modified version of natural growth, does that mean that even though a modified version was used that they won’t perform in institutional settings as well?

Works Cited

Lareau, Annette. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. Print.

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Cover Letter

May 24th, 2010 by ccasares110

I really enjoyed this class because everyone was free to add their input and speak freely. It wasn’t a normal English class where a teacher thinks someone is going to learn the subject by reading a textbook and writing essays that one hates to do because the topics are uninteresting and do not relate to one’s own life or personal experience. I enjoyed watching videos online in class because they got your point across of what you were trying to teach. The Chappelle one was the best hahaha. I feel like i actually learned something in this class and i think i learned how to write better essays because of it. i learned alot in this class and because i took it i found out where the best bathrooms on campus are lol. The class was great and nothing should be changed.

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Scholarship Essay

May 24th, 2010 by ccasares110

Carlos Casares

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

10 May 2010

History and Education: My Goal to Teach At A Higher Level

When I came into college I honestly had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. At one point I had wanted to be a taekwondo instructor but my parents told me that wasn’t a real job. I signed up for a history 101 course just doing it to fulfill a requirement. But after that course I found out I really enjoyed history and the A- for a grade showed me I was pretty good at it. The professor I had, Professor Kinlaw, made the course very interesting and he was honestly a really cool guy. He was the one who told me that I should consider doing history as my major. I never thought I would end up doing that with my life. I was always really good at it in school growing up but never thought anything of it. I even took a bunch of different classes to see if there was anything else I like but nothing really interested me like history did. Next semester I’ m taking two history courses to start working on my major in history.

I used to be a taekwondo instructor for S.Y. Kim’s Taekwondo School. I taught in a school in Forest Hills. What I did was I taught my students, young and old, self-defense and discipline. In that school I was a role model for my students. I showed them how to do techniques properly and by helping them exercise I was showing them how to live a more active, healthier life. Teaching in the school taught me the importance of leadership and helped me discover that I really enjoy teaching. When I was in that school I dedicated myself to making my students become the best they could possibly be. The results showed when we went to tournaments and my students would destroy the ones from other schools. We were the school coming home with the most medals, most being gold. My experience in that school were very valuable in helping guide me to where I am today.

I should be considered for an internal scholarship because I know that when I reach my goal I’m going to be the best history teacher I could possibly be. I plan on teaching at the college level because I feel it is the most rewarding level of education to teach. The age of students I will be teaching will be just as I am now trying to figure out what they want to do with their lives and maybe they will become interested in history as I have become. I have the ambition and the dedication to reach my goal to educate others. When I teach I will make sure people feel like they got their moneys worth and more. Classes in college cost about five hundred dollars a class and if they cost that much one must feel as if they have learned something and have made a useful investment with their money. In this setting my students will not be rewarded with gold medals but with a higher education and knowledge of history. My experiences at my taekwondo school have showed me that when it comes to teaching I’m really good. Honestly I found out that I was a great instructor after my school closed. When I would see my former students or their parents they would ask me where I was teaching and were willing to follow me. If people were willing to go out of their way and travel to wherever I was teaching I’m pretty sure that shows I did something right.

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My Trip To Riker’s Island

May 16th, 2010 by ccasares110

Today for the first time I went  to Riker’s Island. I went  there to go visit my cousin Ariel. The first thing i never knew this place was in Astoria across the water from LaGuardia Airport. Me and my uncle took the bus over ther. AFter we got off the bus my uncle told me to give him my cell phone and anything metal i had. I listened and put it in a locker with him. Then the adventure began from there. A bunch of cops (correction officers) made us go into this line like one would make to go on a roller coaster. Before you could get into the first building your asked for id. That right there was the nicest and most civilized one is treated on there visit. From there i went  into a building that gave me the feeling like i was in the dmv. I immediately had to grab a plastic bucket n take off my belt and empty my pockets into it so i could pass through a metal detector. I then grabbed my stuff and headed into a room where you give your information and details about the person i was visiting. Then buses start coming. There these school buses painted white and everybody runs to them and they cram in. I took a look at the type of people going. i noticed they all looked they they were all from the working or lower classes.  There were alot of ghetto dressed girls, people who were minorites like dominicans who didnt speak english, an asian,and this light skinned puerto rican guy with braids. This puerto rican guy was the loudest on the bus. He was the only douche bag yelling for people to move all the way into the back. Well we traveled to the building where my cousin was in and everybody pushed their way out of the bus. It honestly was uncivilized to me. you would think its one of those movies where like a virus is spreading and people are jamming into those buses sent by the military to get away. Well once i got to the building there was a long ramp and everybody lined up single  file. Three more c.os were there and we were told to get against the rail because a dog was going to come around and smell us. Now here comes this co with a beige lab and he comes walking with the dog n the dog just quickly sniffed and passed people. Now for some reason when the dog came near me i felt like it was gona stop on me and i dont do drugs or none of that shit. Mabe it was my emerging sense of constraint who knows. But it passed me and stopped n sniffed my uncle for a few seconds and then kept going. Then the second to last person the dog just completely stopped and sniffed my down and wouldn’t go away from him. the co said he has something and this guy, who happened to be the loudest puerto rican guy on the bus i mentioned before was taken away separately. then the dog did one more sniff around the line smelled my uncle again who told me just before it came to us: “That mother fucker is gona smell me watch cuz i have dogs at home.” and when he smelled him the co was like “you got dogs at home i can tell. He’s not sniffing you like he was that other guy.” Then i finally entered the building to visit my cousin. we were stuffed inside and forced to go through another metal detector and had to take our shoes off like we were terrorists or something.  Then i had to make another line where this woman co called me my uncle and some other guy in and we had to take off our shoes and socks, roll up our pant legs unbutton our pants and fold over the waists lift our shits and open our mouths. They basically treated me like i was a prisoner.  I then got to go upstairs to the visiting room and wait for my cousin to come through the sliding metal door. A bunch of prisoners kept on coming in bunches in one  piece gray jumpsuits through the door. The weren’t what i was expecting at all. I was expecting big crazy looking guys who were scary like they show you on tv. In fact most of them looked like normal people. I even thought to myself i can beat up most of these guys this place isn’t soo bad. As i waited for my cousin, who was one of the last to come out because hes slow and was sleeping, i observed the other people. Most people were with their families. Some of these prisoners were father’s to little kids and they come out looking miserable and when they see their kids theyr not concerned about looking tough anymore. The faces light up with smiles and they just playing dad again. SOme guys were visited by their girlfriends and they were making out and stuff. Personally i don’t blame them if i was locked up like that and i didn’t have contact with my girlfriend i’d go crazy from sexual frustration. And some people were visited by their parents. This one guy i noticed saw his little boy who was about 2 years old and he picked him up in the air n was hugging him and kissing him and his mom was crying. and then he started crying. he cried for a minute and then controlled himself and held it back. my uncle told me that in there you can’t cry or the fuck with you the pick on you and they steal your food and stuff. Then my cousin came out. now i havent seen my cousin in about two in a half to three years. so when i saw him walk through that door he looked completely different. i could barely recognize him he was just big and he looked older. It was weird though because he saw me and smiled and when he smiled he turned  back into the kid i remember and that i grew up with. So he came over and we talked and stuff and we had a few times where its gona sound gay but we would smile at each other and during those few seconds it was like we were kids again and nothing had ever changed. Now my cousin was stupid and he murdered somebody and you would think hes a bad guy. But when i saw him and each time he smiled i saw that he was still a good kid that just hung out with the wrong kids and made a mistake. Now i wonder is his current condition a product of the way he was reared? He was definitely a natural growth child and to me it looks like he had too much free time. Now his dad had been locked up too so does that effect a child like it would with the correlation of parents level of education and child? i think it might. anyways that was my trip and one final note I’ve noticed that institutional settings all look similar. When i was looking at the prison it looked like a bunch of school buildings, just surrounded by fence and alot of barbed wire. My uncle told he he thought it looked like a military base. SO i wonder why do they all look soo similar? are they all kinda the same? Mabe they all have a common goal like enforcing discipline.

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Crazy Baseball dive

April 22nd, 2010 by ccasares110

I was watching channel 7 news and i saw this clip that they were playing about this kid from Fordham who did this crazy play. While rounding third and heading home the catcher on the opposing team is guarding the plate with the ball ready to tag him out.  This kid does a superman dive over the catcher and scores safely. its crazy you gota see it

Crazy baseball dive

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Essay Assignment 1

April 5th, 2010 by ccasares110

Carlos Casares

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

4 April 2010

Natural Growth as a Way of Child Rearing: Social Class and It’s Effects on Upbringing based on Annette Lareau’s Unequal Childhoods

Child rearing strategies vary from each social class. Working class people use natural growth as a method of child rearing.  Through natural growth a child has more independence and more freedom. There is a boundary between adults and children. Parents use directives rather than persuading their kids to do things. Middle class people who use concerted cultivation enroll their children in organized activities in order to cultivate their talents. Social class influences the method of child rearing. The amount of income received and revenue accessible to the parents may determine their social class. Annette Lareau, a sociologist, studied the difference in child rearing methods between social classes. In her book Unequal Childhoods, Lareau claims:

On the basis of the data collected, I develop the claim that common economic position in the society, determined in terms of social class membership, is closely tied to the differences in the cultural logic of child rearing. (31)

My parents are considered working class according to this book. Their parents also belonged to the working class. Therefore their beliefs on child rearing lean more towards the natural growth method. Natural growth influenced my upbringing. The complete form as described in the book was not applied but most of the methods were used. We never really had a lot of spending money so organized activities didn’t play a factor in my life. With the money we had I got toys and things like video games and played independently or with my friends.  I was more independent and stayed home by myself sometimes because my parents both had to work. My mom works as a full time nurse and my dad has two jobs as a lab technician in the hospital. Important things like paying the bills came first, not enrolling me in organized activities that are costly. People in middle class families have money on hand and could buy their kids BMW’s as their first car and stuff. But to have extra money to spend my parents have to work for it. So through different social classes, there’s obviously going to be differences because money and the amount of time parents spend working will influence how they can bring up their kids. Therefore, Lareau is correct in her claim because social class plays an important factor in child rearing..

As a child I knew my economic condition and but I still had choices of things I could do. Being part of the working class did not mean I was poor so therefore I had something, not anything. In fact in my opinion I had a lot and I was happy with what I had. If I wanted to play with my friends or go out that was my choice. I got everything I basically could ask for and whether I wanted to be active with my friends or not was my choice.  Lareau describes this as the accomplishment of natural growth. In Unequal Childhoods she states:

The limited economic resources available to the working class and poor families make getting children fed, clothed, sheltered and transported time-consuming, arduous labor. Parents tend to direct their efforts toward keeping children safe, enforcing discipline, and, when they deem it necessary, regulating their behavior in specific areas. Within these boundaries, working-class and poor children are allowed to grow and to thrive. They are given the flexibility to choose activities and playmates and to decide how active or inactive to be as they engage in these activities.

My parents worked to make sure I had everything I needed. Whenever my dad and I got into an argument he always said “I work so hard to make sure you have food and everything you need.” So he made it known that he worked to do things like that. I believe this is the basis of natural growth. Parents that can’t afford to give their kids everything but work as hard as they can to give them everything they can and keep them safe and happy and give them as good a life as possible. To me I felt like I got enough time from my parents and I knew they would go to work so I could get the things I wanted so it never bothered me. To me honestly everything that happened in my childhood I considered normal. I never felt neglected because my parents had to work or anything.

Growing up I became more independent and I liked to do things without my parents help. This really happened in 5th grade because I was required to do more things on my own. It started with school and now that 5th grade begun I had to take the school bus to take me to a separate building that only held the 5th grade.  My parents went to work in the morning which left me to take the bus on my own and come home and stay alone. I actually enjoyed it because I wanted to be more independent; I wanted to do things on my own. According to Annette Lareau this is a result of a lack of adult attention in my activities. She says:

The lack of adult attention and involvement in their activities leaves children in working-class and poor homes free to concentrate on pleasing themselves. The children we studied tended to show more creativity, spontaneity, enjoyment, and initiative in their leisure pastimes than we saw among middle-class children at play in organized activities. (83)

My parent’s jobs left me on my own most of the time and I actually enjoyed it. I felt older having more freedom and independence in doing my own things. I remember I used to look forward to going to school because all the people at my bus stop and I  would come a little bit early before the bus came to chill and just hang out and have fun. The same went for after school we would all get on the bus and have a lot of fun. When we got off there would just be a big group of us all hanging out and having fun. I can say that if “leisure pastimes” is just those stories that you can talk about with your friends and be like “remember when…,”then I could say that I certainly enjoyed my leisure pastime.  I enjoyed being allowed to stay home alone and I wanted to because to me I was older and having a baby sitter was gay.  But like all the kids I grew up with had the same mindset. We were mature for our age. I have a little sister and she’s very dependent on my mom, but I think that’s because my parents took more of a concerted cultivation approach to her. My cousin went to school with me in 5th grade and sometimes we talk about the things we remember like fights, the bus rides, or just stupid things. The independence I had allowed me to enjoy my childhood more because I was able to make decisions and do what I wanted. Also being able to spend time with my friends allowed me to enjoy my childhood and it gave me stories to tell.

Natural growth as a means of child rearing has both positive and negative effects. Natural growth yields the accomplishment of natural growth (the positive) and a sense of constraint (the negative). The sense of constraint affects one’s performance in institutional settings. When raised through natural growth one “is less likely to try to customize interactions to suit their own preferences.”(6) They conform to the actions of the institution and persons of authority. The result of conformity in institutional settings produces children “unable to make the rules work for in their favor nor do they obtain capital for adulthood.” (7) Lareau explains this in her book by saying:

What is the outcome of these different philosophies and approaches to child rearing? Quite simply they lead to the transmission of differential advantages to children. In this study, there was quite a bit more talking in the middle class homes than in working-class and poor homes, leading to the development of greater verbal agility, larger vocabularies, more comfort with authority figures, and more familiarity with abstract concepts. Importantly, children also developed skill differences in interacting with authority figures in institutions and at home. (5)

Every time I went to the doctor I never told him my symptoms or how I felt. My mom decided that job belonged to her. Maybe because she works as a nurse and she felt entitled to tell the doctor my symptoms could possibly explain her actions. As a child I didn’t mind but as I started getting older I would tell her not to come in but she did regardless.  By doing this she contributed to developing a sense of constraint for me by obstructing my communication in an institutional environment. My experiences in the doctor’s office differ from a middle class child like Alexander Williams whose mother “explicitly trained and encouraged him to speak up with the doctor.” (6)

Growing up a clear boundary presented itself between adult and child. My father emphasized this boundary especially. He believes this in this boundary and taught me to always respect adults and know my place. However our views of respect have greatly differed from the past until this present day. He believes more in natural growth because that is the way he was raised. Lareau describes parents’ ideology in this subject as:

These mothers and fathers do not focus on concerted cultivation. For them, the crucial responsibilities of parenthood do not lie in eliciting their children’s feelings, opinions, and thoughts. Rather, they see a clear boundary between adults and children. (pg.3) Thus whereas middle class children often are treated as a project to be developed, working class and poor children are given boundaries for their behavior and then allowed to grow. (67)

Growing up I had to show respect to my elders like my grandparents, parents, aunt, and uncles. I had always felt it was unnecessary to call my aunts and uncles either aunt or uncle before their actual name. I always got in trouble for that and still do sometimes to this day by my dad.  Every time I forgot I always got the response “Oh is that your brother/sister, I thought they were my brother/sister.” Being a very stubborn man, my father always flipped out when I talked back or questioned his demands. I always thought that was ridiculous and very childlike when he threw a fit whenever he was questioned. My father believed in the “clear boundary” between adults and children and “elicit” my feelings, opinions or thoughts when he wanted me to do something.

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Pie Paragraph

March 24th, 2010 by ccasares110

Carlos Casares

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

24 March 2010

In A Girl Like Me, an experiment done by Doctor Kenneth Clark in the 1950’s was recreated. The experiment involved two identical dolls, one white and one black. A group of African American children, around the ages of 4 and 5, were individually asked which doll they would rather play with. A majority of the children preferred the white doll. When each child is asked which doll is the good doll, every child picked up the white doll. When asked why, the common response was, “because it’s white.” When asked which doll is the bad doll every kid picked up the black doll, and when asked why the response was “because it’s black.” One little girl when asked which doll looked like her, unconsciously reached for the white doll, hesitated for a moment, and unenthusiastically chose the black doll. According to Pierre Bourdieu this reaction is due to an idea/image implanted in this little girl’s head through a belief acquired through socialization. He writes:

“Because the economy of symbolic goods is based on belief, the principle of its reproduction or crisis is found in the reproduction or crisis of belief, that is, in continuity or rupture with the adjustment between mental structures (categories of perception and appreciation, systems of preference) and objective structures.” (121-122)

The relation between this quote and the little girl’s response is that an image of an ideal looking baby is portrayed through dolls, just as in the case with models supposedly being ideal images of beauty. This creates beliefs of wanting to achieve this level of perfection that is depicted through outlets such as the media, or material objects such as dolls. The hesitation is proof how subliminal ideas are implemented into children as young as four or five.  This form of brainwashing relates directly to what Bourdieu describes as “social violence.” The little girl’s original action was to reach for the white doll which is perfect evidence because children don’t think, they act. Her hesitation is her moment of realization. This little girl at that exact moment has just realized that she is the doll that she labeled as the “bad” baby. However she believes she’s good which unconsciously lead her to pick the white doll originally.  Her realization is proof that her mental structure and thoughts have been “ruptured” by the media and society. This little girl has just encountered, probably for the first time, a stereotype. She has learned that what is depicted as a good baby does not look like her. In fact what she looks like is labeled as “bad,” so therefore is she bad? All these theories and statements probably went through this little girls head during and after her moment of realization. This is all a result of a belief put forth by a group we don’t know or will never see and it changes what we believe and leads us to support this proposed idea. The reason we have some to support this idea is because our “categories of perception” and “systems of perception” have been adjusted to believe it as true.

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School writing

March 22nd, 2010 by ccasares110

The writing we do at school can be more like the writing we do out of school if it was more like what we have for this class. We could be allowed to write how we talk and about things we want to talk about leaving options to write about. Most of the time we have to write stupid papers on things we do not care about and will never use in life because its required. I think the way of writing is school needs to be modernized and teachers should keep up with the changing times. I think thats a pretty good reason but i also know that we need to write the way we do sometimes so that when we go out into the real world and get a job we don’t write like retards and it actually looks like were educated. So there’s just a limit on how our writing at school could be more like the writing at home. There can be changes but we just can’t change everything. Writing essays and stuff should be done in real classes like english and history, not classes like intro to music or urban studies and crap like that (philosophy shouldn’t even be a class whoever majors in philosophy is not doing anything special. There just doing what you can do if you smoke a blunt.) Writing outside of school is basically jst talking because we write how we talk informally and we cut words down to what they sound like most of the time.

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Martin Luther King visiting QC

March 22nd, 2010 by ccasares110

I don’t think MLK visiting queens college is important to me. I really don’t know that much about the civil rights movement because i never really studied it but i just know it was about segregation, and equal rights, and a woman not wanting to get out of her seat on a bus and that led to equal rights for black people. I don’t know if the civil rights movement affects Spanish people but i don’t think its important to me historically. I guess at the time it was good for queens college because he was pretty famous at the time. even though nothing really happened the guy gave a forty minute speech about someone who died, not even close to the time but a year later when people have forgotten.  Honestly i think the whole visit was just hyped up.

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